“In a surge of anger I hid my face from you for a moment, but with everlasting kindness I will have compassion on you,” says the LORD your Redeemer.” was said in Isaiah 54:8 and I wonder, does God get angry? 

Its seems the answer is yet, slow to anger and quick to forgive. Reach the commentaries below. I will post a longer personal opinion after more reading. 

“54:6-10 As God is slow to anger, so he is swift to show mercy. And how sweet the returns of mercy would be, when God should come and comfort them! He will have mercy on them. God’s gathering his people takes rise from his mercy, not any merit of theirs; and it is with great mercies, with everlasting kindness. The wrath is little, the mercies great; the wrath for a moment, the kindness everlasting. We are neither to despond under afflictions, nor to despair of relief. Mountains have been shaken and removed, but the promises of God never were broken by any event. Mountains and hills also signify great men. Creature-confidences shall fail; but when our friends fail us, our God does not. All this is alike applicable to the church at large, and to each believer. God will rebuke and correct his people for sins; but he will not cast them off. Let this encourage us to give the more diligence to make our calling and election sure.”

In a little wrath I hid my face from thee for a moment,…. This signifies much the same as before, when God hides his face from his people, withdraws his gracious presence, and does not grant the discoveries of his love; or they are under the frowns of his providence, and have not the smiles of his face and the light of his countenance as formerly, then they think they are forsaken by him; though all this is but for a moment, a small period of time; and though it seems to be in “wrath”, it is but “little wrath”; and this wrath is no other than the displeasure of a loving and tender hearted father. The Syriac version renders it, “great wrath”; and so Schultens (o) thinks the word signifies “overflowing wrath” (p), and the vehemency of it; to which agrees R. Menachem (q), who interprets it, “the heat of wrath”; so the Lord’s suffering such a scene of bloody persecutions to attend his church in the first ages of Christianity might seem to be: 
but with everlasting kindness will I have mercy on thee, saith the Lord thy Redeemer; all the dealings of God with his people, however dark and dismal they be, whatever appearances there are in them of wrath and displeasure, they are all agreeable to, and do not contradict, his everlasting love; and sooner or later he will make it manifest, he has mercy in store for his people, which he does and will exercise towards them; this mercy flows from his love and kindness to them, which kindness is everlasting, and continues in and through all states and conditions into which they come; the consideration of which is very comfortable and encouraging, and of which they may be assured from the relation the Lord stands in to them as their Redeemer; for, having redeemed them at the expense of his blood, he will effectually gather them by grace in calling, and will never lose them, or suffer them to perish here or hereafter. 

Isaiah 52:14 NLT ‘Just as there were many who were appalled at him — his appearance was so disfigured beyond that of any human being and his form marred beyond human likeness–“

From what I have read is that the section 52 of Isaiah is a prophecy of the coming Messiah. 

Studylight.org says:

John Gill’s Exposition of the Whole Bible

“As many were astonished at thee,…. Not so much at the miracles he wrought, the doctrines he taught, and the work he did; or at his greatness and glory, at his exaltation and dignity, though very wonderful; as at his humiliation, the mean appearance he made, the low estate he was brought into; the sufferings and death which he underwent. These words are placed between the account of his exaltation and humiliation, and may be thought to have respect to both; and indeed it is astonishing that one so great as he was, and is, should become so low as he did; and also that one that was brought so low should be raised so high:

his visage was so marred more than any man, and his form more than the sons of men; though fairer than the children of men, as he was the immediate workmanship of the divine Spirit, and without sin; yet, what with his griefs and sorrows he bore, and troubles he met with; what with watchings and fastings, with laborious preaching, and constant travelling about to do good; what with sweat and blood, with buffetings and scourgings, never was any man’s face more marred, or his form more altered, than his was.”

Bibletools.org shows this mention of prophesy:

A mention of prophesy” “he prophet Isaiah prophesies how Jesus appeared after the scourging: “Just as many were astonished at you, so His visage [appearance, margin] was marred more than any man, and His form more than the sons of men” (Isaiah 52:14)

Isaiah 50:6 NLT “I offered my back to those who beat me, my cheeks to those who pulled out my beard; I did not hide my face from mocking and spitting.”

Stated onhttp://www.aboutbibleprophecy.com/isaiah_50_6.htm

“The prophet Isaiah received many prophecies from God about the Messiah, about 700 years before the Messiah (Jesus) was born. In Isaiah’s prophecies, he often referred to the Messiah as a servant. In Isaiah 50:6, Isaiah wrote about the abuse that the Messiah would endure at the hands of sinful people, that he would offer his back to those who beat him, his face to those who rip out his beard, and himself to those who mock and taunt him.

Christians historically have acknowledged this Old Testament prophecy as being fulfilled by Jesus Christ. Jesus, as explained in the New Testament, was beaten, mocked and taunted shortly before his crucifixion by the Romans. In Matthew 26:67 (NIV translation), for example, it says: Then they spit in his face and struck him with their fists. Others slapped him and said, “Prophesy to us, Christ. Who hit you?”

 

In Isaiah 41:14 ESV it says “Fear not, you worm Jacob, you men of Israel! I am the one who helps you, declares the LORD; your Redeemer is the Holy One of Israel.”

StudyLight.org Adam Clarke’s commentary:

“Fear not, thou worm Jacob – In the rabbinical commentary on the five books of Moses, Yelamedenu, it is asked, Why are the Israelites called a worm? To signify, that as the worm does not smite, that is, gnaw the cedars, but with its mouth, which is very tender, yet it nevertheless destroys the hard wood; so all the strength of the Israelites is in prayer, by which they smite the wicked of this world, though strong like the cedars, to which they are compared, Ezekiel 31:3.”

This site also has a good explanation: https://gracevalley.org/sermon/the-theology-of-a-worm/

In Isaiah 29:1 it states NLT “What sorrow awaits Ariel, the City of David. Year after year you celebrate your feasts.”

Bible-Studys.org states “The word Ariel means “lion of God,” referring to the city’s strength and perhaps “hearth of God,” referring to the place where the altar of God always burns. (Verses 7-8), show this to be a name for Jerusalem and the chapter looks to the invasion of Jerusalem because of unbelief.”

 

The passage in Isaiah 13:17 was very confusing to me. It says “Behold, I will stir up the Medes against them, which shall not regard silver; and as for gold, they shall not delight in it.”

Bible Hub gives this explanation: Which shall not regard silver.—The Medes are represented as a people too fierce to care for the gold and silver in which Babylon exulted. They would take no ransom to stay their work of vengeance. So Xenophon, in his Cyropædia (5:3), represents Cyrus as acknowledging their unbought, unpaid service.”

StudyLight.org says the following:

Adam Clarke Commentary 

Which shall not regard silver “Who shall hold silver of no account” – That is, who shall not be induced, by large offers of gold and silver for ransom, to spare the lives of those whom they have subdued in battle; their rage and cruelty will get the better of all such motives. We have many examples in the Iliad and in the Aeneid of addresses of the vanquished to the pity and avarice of the vanquishers, to induce them to spare their lives.

The explanation I like best is that they wish so much destruction upon them that they care not for gold or silver.